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Paul Edison-Effect (excerpt)

Paul DeMarinis

The Edison Effect: A Listener's Companion

Label: Het Apollohuis

Format: CD

Genre: Sound Art

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€18.00
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A sound recording never preserves quite what it claims to preserve. Aspects are missing and alien elements introduced. On this CD there are many voices (from old records & wax cylinders), but always the surrounding noises draw the attention. Paul DeMarinis is a sound engineer who collaborated with several avantgarde composers, and then became an avantgarde composer himself.  His compositions for speech, processed and synthesized by computers, such as Beneath the Numbered Sky, are collected on Music as a Second Language (Lovely Music, 1991). "The Edison Effect" that uses optics and computers to make new sounds by scanning ancient phonograph records with lasers

Details
Cat. number: ACD 039514
Year: 1995
Edison Effect is an audio essay of sorts, that seeks to address artistic issues through the exploration and deconstruction of the mediums, and employs the laser beam of digital audio interpreting the analog grooves carved into wax | Read more

For this recording, the acclaimed sound artist created theoretically dense work which explores the relationships between recording technologies. Working with the faults of mediums lifetimes apart -- the early Wax Cylinder Phonograph and Digital audio suite -- he recorded signals imbued with the inherent noise of the opposing mediums. Recording the results back and forth on both technologies ancient and new, this experimental work strives to make music with the hidden textures of history. In short, The Edison Effect is an audio essay of sorts, that seeks to address artistic issues through the exploration and deconstruction of the mediums, and employs the laser beam of digital audio interpreting the analog grooves carved into wax. Aesthetically, this work is a meditative animation of nostalgia, with the idiosyncrasies of the failing mediums providing the texture and tonality to these quiet pensive compositions. Predating the glitch movement where recorded medium deconstruction became the vogue of artist such as Oval and Otomo Yoshahide, the recording has similarities to vinyl deconstruction artist Christian Marclay and Philip Jeck, and comes highly recommended to those intrigued by such explorations.